The Frontline Battle is an inquiry by the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Alcohol Harm into the impact of alcohol on Emergency Services. The report reveals the full extent of the pressures and dangers of alcohol related problems placed on our Emergency Services discussing the impact on staff, the impact on service provisions and the effect on time and resources. Read the full report here.

Fiona Bruce MP, Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Alcohol Harm, said:

“It should be wholly unacceptable to hear of an A&E consultant being kicked in the face, medical staff having TV’s thrown at them, or female police officers being sexually assaulted. And it’s not just emergency staff who suffer; as this report describes many other people are impacted too, from taxpayers who foot the bill, to patients who can’t be seen promptly, or worse, those innocent people killed in avoidable drunk driving accidents.

“Urgent action, as described in this report, is needed from Government at the highest level in order to address this.”.

Steve Irving, Executive Officer of the Association of Ambulance Chief Executives, said:

“The ambulance service attends too many patients suffering from alcohol-related injuries or illnesses, many of which would not occur without the consumption of excess alcohol. This takes valuable resources away from patients who may be seriously ill so it is clear that more widespread safe drinking, in moderation, would significantly relieve the pressure on ambulance services and the wider health economy, especially emergency departments of local hospitals.

“The ambulance service also attends many alcohol-related road traffic collisions each year, some of which result in death and serious injury to members of the public. This is why AACE is actually in favour of ultimately lowering the drink driving limit to zero.”

Alcohol Concern provides the secretariat for the All Party Parliamentary Group on Alcohol Harm and welcomes the recommendations made by the report.

Joanna Simons, Chief Executive of Alcohol Concern, said: “The costs of alcohol harm to the UK are huge, not only in terms on lives lost but also through the significant impact on society and our emergency services. Alcohol costs us all, even when we’re not buying alcohol ourselves.

“What this report highlights is the enormous pressure our emergency service staff face every day. We need the UK Government to act and take steps to implement the report’s recommendations, including lowering the drink drive limit and tackling cheap and high-strength alcohol, which we know will work in reducing alcohol-related harms and ease the strain on frontline staff.”